Enemies of the Internet
Fig. 1. Courtesy of Reporters Sans Frontieres, 2013.

Reporters Without Borders releases its Enemies of the Internet 2013 Report. Special Edition: Surveillance, which focuses on "all the monitoring and spying" that is targeting dissidents, activists and citizens in general. Five countries identified as "State Enemies of the Internet" are Syria, China, Iran, Bahrain and Vietnam. Five private-sector companies listed as "Corporate Enemies of the Internet" are Gamma, Trovicor, Hacking Team, Amesys and Blue Coat.

From the report's introduction:

... we are publishing two lists. One is a list of five “State Enemies of the Internet, ” five countries whose governments are involved in active, intrusive surveillance of news providers, resulting in grave violations of freedom of information and human rights. The five state enemies are Syria, China, Iran, Bahrain and Vietnam.

The other is a list of five “Corporate Enemies of the Internet,” five private-sector companies that are “digital era mercenaries.” The five companies chosen are Gamma, Trovicor, Hacking Team, Amesys and Blue Coat, but the list is not exhaustive and will be expanded in the coming months. They all sell products that are liable to be used by governments to violate human rights and freedom of information.

Their products have been or are being used to commit violations of human rights and freedom of information. If these companies decided to sell to authoritarian regimes, they must have known that their products could be used to spy on journalists, dissidents and netizens. If their digital surveillance products were sold to an authoritarian regime by an intermediary without their knowledge, their failure to keep track of the exports of their own software means they did not care if their technology was misused and did not care about the vulnerability of those who defend human rights.

The full report is available for PDF download here.

Related articles on Digital Islam can be found here:

Reporters Without Borders' Internet Enemies Report 2012

Reporters Without Borders' Internet Enemies Report 2011