Anonymous, 22 Mar 2019
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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

The Israeli-Hezbollah War of 2006: The Media as a Weapon in an Asymmetrical Conflict

The Israeli-Hezbollah War of 2006: The Media as a Weapon in an Asymmetrical Conflict

In the summer of 2006, the world’s attention was once again riveted on a bloody war erupted between Hezbollah and Israel. It quickly became apparent that this was not the traditional war between Israel and an Arab state; it was rather an asymmetrical war, the new prototype of Middle East conflict, between a state (Israel) and a militant, secretive, religiously fundamentalist sect or faction, such as, in the case of Lebanon, Hezbollah, the “Party of God” or in the case of the Gaza strip, Hamas. New York Times columnist David Brooks has described these various groups in three ways: as “subnational,” like the Mahdi Army in Iraq; “supranational,” like the unofficial alliances linking Hezbollah and Hamas to Iran and Syria; or “transnational,” like communication networks, such as the two Arabic-language newspapers published in London and distributed throughout the Arab world, and even more crucial to understanding this asymmetrical warfare, the two cable television networks: 1/ Al-Jazeera, the most popular TV network in the region broadcasting out of Qatar, and 2/ Al-Arabiya, the second most popular network, broadcasting out of nearby Dubai. In their coverage, both exploit the most sophisticated technology to carry their reports into the cafes and castles, huts and hamlets of the Middle East. Also in this “transnational” world of media interconnectivity, at the very apex, stands the Internet, perhaps the most revolutionary technology in the modern world.

 

 

article
35 p.
eng
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