Anonymous, 18 Sep 2019
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A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

God in the Game: Cosmopolitanism and Religious Conflict in Videogames

God in the Game: Cosmopolitanism and Religious Conflict in Videogames

Global interconnectedness is deeply related to electronic ubiquity, the technological dependence that in recent decades has resulted in a smart phone in nearly every American pocket, fidgeted with and fondled on an alarmingly predictable basis. As Todd Gitlin argues, “never have so many communicated so much, on so many screens, through so many channels, absorbing so many hours of irreplaceable human attention, about communications” (2002: 4). The sheer proliferation of channels of information flying around our wired lives may lead us to believe that important things are happening, that relationships are being built, problems being solved. The kind of optimism that this view inspires sometimes takes on religious overtones, with promises of utopic unification via online connection. The reality, however, may be less promising, as we look for algorithms to make sense of our world and find the simplest ones the most appealing, even if they invite us to dehumanize others.

article
ISSN 1477-4585
eng