Anonymous, 19 Oct 2019
Research on Middle East, Islam and digital media
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New Book: Muslim Fashion: Contemporary Style Cultures

The book contextualizes modest wardrobe styling within Islamic and global consumer cultures, interviewing key players including designers, bloggers, shoppers, store clerks, and shop owners. Focusing on Britain, North America, and Turkey, the author provides insights into the ways young Muslim women use multiple fashion systems to negotiate religion, identity, and ethnicity.

New Book: Networked Publics and Digital Contention: The Politics of Everyday Life in Tunisia

The book narrates the story of the co-evolution of technology and society in Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab uprisings. It explores the emergence of a digital culture of contention that helped networked publics negotiate their lived reality, reconfigure power relations, and ultimately redefine the locus of politics. It broadens the focus from narrow debates about the role that social media played in the Arab uprisings toward a fresh understanding of how changes in media affect the state-society relationship over time. Based on extensive fieldwork, in-depth interviews with Internet activists, and immersive analyses of online communication, this book draws our attention away from the tools of political communication and refocuses it on the politics of communication.

New Project: Roshan Initiative in Persian Digital Humanities

The Roshan Institute for Persian Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park has embarked on an ambitious Persian digital humanities initiative, called the Roshan Initiative in Persian Digital Humanities at the University of Maryland (PersDig@UMD). The initiative is a collaborative effort involving the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), UMD’s library services, and Maryland Language Science Center (MLSC). They currently are developing six projects: DocuNow Persian Archive, Persian Digital Manuscript Archive, Persian E-Book Database, Roshan Institute Open-Access E-Books, the Persian Digital Library, and the Lalehzar Street Digital Archive.

New Book: Media, Diaspora and Conflict: Nationalism and Identity Amongst Turkish and Kurdish Migrants in Europe

The book offers an analysis of how Turkish and Kurdish migrants in Europe react to the myriad mediated narratives. A vital element is how media outlets report and represent the ethno-national conflict between the Turkish state and the Kurdish PKK. Janroj Yilmaz Keles here offers an examination of how Turkish and Kurdish migrants in Europe react to the myriad narratives that arise. Taking as his starting point an analysis of the nature of nationalisms in the modern age, Keles shows how language is often a central element in the struggle for hegemony within a state. The media has become a site for the clash of representations in both Turkish and Kurdish languages, especially for those based in the diaspora in Europe.

New Book: Preaching Islamic Revival: Amr Khaled, Mass Media and Social Change in Egypt

The book examines the differences between Amr Khaled's pre-revolutionary and post-revolutionary messages and looking in-depth at how deals with the concepts of Islam and modernity. By examining issues such as Amr Khaled s use of mass media, his views on gender role and the nature of political and religious rule, the author offers a book which will appeal to those interested in the changes that Egypt has experienced over the last century.

New Book: Dissonant Archives: Contemporary Visual Culture and Competing Narratives in the Middle East

The book to considers the ways in which contemporary artists from the Middle East and North Africa - including Emily Jacir, Walid Raad, Jananne Al Ani, Basel Abbas and Ruanne Abou-Rahme, Mariam Ghani, Zineb Sedira, and Akram Zaatari - are utilizing and disrupting the function of the archive and, in so doing, highlighting a systemic, perhaps irrevocable, crisis in institutional and state-ordained archiving across the region. In exploring and producing archives, be they alternative, interrogative or fictional, these artists are not simply questioning the authenticity, authority or authorship of the archive; rather, they are unlocking its regenerative, radical potential.

New Book: Digital Passages: Migrant Youth 2.0: Diaspora, Gender and Youth Cultural Intersections

The book is a ground-breaking analysis of the ways that youth culture online interacts with issues of diaspora, gender, and belonging. Drawing on surveys, in-depth interviews, and ethnography, the author builds an interdisciplinary portrait of online youth culture and the spaces it opens up for migrant youth to negotiate power relations and to promote intercultural understanding.

New Issue of the Journal of African Media Studies

The Journal of African Media Studies released its new issue (Vol. 7, Issue 2, 2015), edited by Winston Mano from the Communication and Media Research Institute (CAMRI) at the University of Westminster. This issue includes articles on conflict journalism, street artists' resistance, social media use during the elections, and more.

New Book: Women and Media in the Middle East: From Veiling to Blogging

This book investigates the diverse realities and complexities of women in the Middle East in terms of their relationship with media platforms old and new. Contributors offer a range of perspectives that discuss everything from media portrayals of the veil to women in film and television, from women’s involvement as activists on the street to the role played in the Arab Spring by cyber activism. The collection provides insight into how some women in the Middle East are utilizing traditional as well as new media for purposes of self-expression, activism, and democratization, while also investigating media portrayals of women at home and in the West.

New Book: Ten Arab Filmmakers: Political Dissent and Social Critique

The book provides an up-to-date overview of the best of Arab cinema, offering studies of leading directors and in-depth analyses of their most important films. The filmmakers profiled here represent principal national cinemas of the Arab world—Algeria, Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco, Palestine, and Syria. Although they have produced many of the region’s most-renowned films and gained recognition at major international festivals, with few exceptions these filmmakers have received little critical attention. All ten share a concern with giving image and voice to people struggling against authoritarian regimes, patriarchal traditions, or religious fundamentalism—theirs is a cinéma engagé.
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