Anonymous, 22 Mar 2019
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New Issue of the Arab Media and Society

The online journal Arab Media and Society has published its new issue (Issue 21, 2015) that focuses on pan-Arab TV channels, Egyptian media, and terrorism. Some articles include podcasts.

New Book: Muslim Fashion: Contemporary Style Cultures

The book contextualizes modest wardrobe styling within Islamic and global consumer cultures, interviewing key players including designers, bloggers, shoppers, store clerks, and shop owners. Focusing on Britain, North America, and Turkey, the author provides insights into the ways young Muslim women use multiple fashion systems to negotiate religion, identity, and ethnicity.

New Book: Media, Diaspora and Conflict: Nationalism and Identity Amongst Turkish and Kurdish Migrants in Europe

The book offers an analysis of how Turkish and Kurdish migrants in Europe react to the myriad mediated narratives. A vital element is how media outlets report and represent the ethno-national conflict between the Turkish state and the Kurdish PKK. Janroj Yilmaz Keles here offers an examination of how Turkish and Kurdish migrants in Europe react to the myriad narratives that arise. Taking as his starting point an analysis of the nature of nationalisms in the modern age, Keles shows how language is often a central element in the struggle for hegemony within a state. The media has become a site for the clash of representations in both Turkish and Kurdish languages, especially for those based in the diaspora in Europe.

New Book: Digital Passages: Migrant Youth 2.0: Diaspora, Gender and Youth Cultural Intersections

The book is a ground-breaking analysis of the ways that youth culture online interacts with issues of diaspora, gender, and belonging. Drawing on surveys, in-depth interviews, and ethnography, the author builds an interdisciplinary portrait of online youth culture and the spaces it opens up for migrant youth to negotiate power relations and to promote intercultural understanding.

Religion in Cyberspace 2015

Nov 27, 2015 – Nov 28, 2015
Brno
Czech Republic
Organized by the Faculty of Law in cooperation with the Faculty of Social Studies, Masaryk University, and European Academy of Law and ICT
http://cyberspace.muni.cz/
study of religion, Internet studies, media studies, Czech Republic
cyberspace@law.muni.cz
Jul 31, 2015

Book: Radicalization in Western Europe: Integration, Public Discourse and Loss of Identity among Muslim Communities

Employing a theoretical framework based on the concept of identity loss, this book seeks to understand why increased integration has stimulated greater radicalization among the Muslim populations in Western Europe. Through extensive field research in four European countries – the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and France – the authors investigate three key questions: 1) Why are 2nd and 3rd generations of Muslims in Europe more radical than their parents?; 2) Why does Europe experience more "home-grown terrorism" today than thirty or forty years ago?; 3) Why do some European countries feature more radical Muslim communities than others?

Book: Medina in Birmingham, Najaf in Brent: Inside British Islam

This book is a definitive guide to the ideological differences, organisational structures and international links of the main Islamic groups active in Britain today. The vast majority of Britain’s 1600 mosques are linked to wider sectarian networks: the Deobandi and Tablighi Jamaat movements with their origins in colonial India; the Salafi groups inspired by an austere form of Islam widely practiced in Saudi Arabia; the Islamist movements with links to religious political parties in the Middle East and South Asia; the Sufi movements that tend to emphasise spirituality rather than religious and political militancy; and the diverse Shi’ite sects which range from the orthodox disciples of Grand Ayatollah Sistani in Iraq to the Ismaili followers of the pragmatic and modernising Aga Khan.

New Book: ‘We Love Death As You Love Life’: Britain's Suburban Terrorists

This book offers an insight into the motivations behind Mohammed Siddique Khan and his group, as well as the hundreds of young British Muslims who have been drawn by jihadist ideas to fight on battlefields at home and abroad. From the arrival of immigrant communities to the UK and the establishment of diasporas with strong ethnic connections to the Middle East and South Asia, to the arrival of jihadist warriors fresh from the anti-Soviet war in Afghanistan, Pantucci looks at the history that came before Mohammed Siddique Khan and places his action within its larger context.
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