Anonymous, 25 Sep 2017
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keyword: Iran
Olesya Venger, When Shaming Backfires: The Doublespeak of Digitally-Manipulated Misogynistic Photographs, CyberOrient, Vol. 10, Iss. 1, 2016
CyberOrient
Ali Honari, Online Social Research in Iran: A Need to Offer a Bigger Picture, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 2, 2015
CyberOrient
Bronwen Robertson, James Marchant, A Safe Refuge? Minorities and the State in Iranian Cyberspace, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 2, 2015
CyberOrient
Ahmed Al-Rawi, Jacob Groshek, Arab Iranians and Their Social Media Use, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 2, 2015
CyberOrient

Book: Iranian Music and Popular Entertainment: From Motrebi to Losanjelesi and Beyond

The authors examine the historically overlooked motrebi milieu, with its marginalized characters, from luti to gardan koloft and mashti, as well as the tenacity of motreb who continued their careers against all odds. They then turn to losanjelesi, the most pervasive form of Iranian popular music that developed as motrebi declined, and related musical forms in Iran and its diasporic popular cultural centre, Los Angeles. For the first time in English, the book makes available musical transcriptions, analysis and lyrics that illustrate the complexities of this history.

New Book: Occidentalism in Iran: Representations of the West in the Iranian Media

The book traces how the West is represented as the Occident in the country's media. From the Qajar period and the Tobacco protests of the late nineteenth century to the ill-fated Anglo-Persian Treaty of 1919, through to the 1953 coup and 1979 hostage crisis, the author highlights the various points in history when misinterpretations and conflicts led to a demonisation of the other in the Iranian media. The major recent source of contention between the West and Iran has of course been the nuclear issue and the resultant regime of sanctions. By examining how this and other issues have been represented by the Iranian press, Bakshandeh offers a crucial and often-overlooked aspect of the key relationship between Iran and the West.

Book: Social Media in Iran: Politics and Society After 2009

The book tells the complex story of how and why the Iranian people—including women, homosexuals, dissidents, artists, and even state actors—use social media technology, and in doing so create a contentious environment wherein new identities and realities are constructed. Drawing together emerging and established scholars in communication, culture, and media studies, this volume considers the role of social media in Iranian society, particularly the time during and after the controversial 2009 presidential election, a watershed moment in the postrevolutionary history of Iran.

New Project: Roshan Initiative in Persian Digital Humanities

The Roshan Institute for Persian Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park has embarked on an ambitious Persian digital humanities initiative, called the Roshan Initiative in Persian Digital Humanities at the University of Maryland (PersDig@UMD). The initiative is a collaborative effort involving the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), UMD’s library services, and Maryland Language Science Center (MLSC). They currently are developing six projects: DocuNow Persian Archive, Persian Digital Manuscript Archive, Persian E-Book Database, Roshan Institute Open-Access E-Books, the Persian Digital Library, and the Lalehzar Street Digital Archive.

New Book: Surviving Images: Cinema, War, and Cultural Memory in the Middle East

The book explores the prominent role of cinema in the development of cultural memory around war and conflict in colonial and postcolonial contexts. It does so through a study of three historical eras: the colonial period, the national-independence struggle, and the postcolonial. Beginning with a study of British colonial cinema on the Sudan, then exploring anti-colonial cinema in Algeria, Egypt and Tunisia, followed by case studies of films emerging from postcolonial contexts in Palestine, Iran, Lebanon, and Israel, this work aims to fill a gap in the critical literature on both Middle Eastern cinemas, and to contribute more broadly to scholarship on social trauma and cultural memory in colonial and postcolonial contexts.

Book: Contemporary Iranian Art: From the Street to the Studio

Contemporary Iranian Art is the first comprehensive book on Iranian art and visual culture since the 1979 revolution. Divided into three parts – street, studio and exile – it covers official art sponsored by the Islamic Republic, the culture of avant-garde art created in the studio and its display in galleries and museums, and the art of the Iranian diaspora within the Western art scene. The author argues that these different areas of artistic production cannot be fully understood independently, for it is not despite censorship and exile that we are witnessing a boom in Iranian art today, as many have argued, but because of them. Moving between subversive and daring art produced in private to propaganda art made in the public view, this book offers an artistic mirror of the socio-political turmoil that has marked Iran's recent history.
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