Anonymous, 22 Feb 2020
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keyword: Iran

Videogame Development in the Middle East: Iran, the Arab World, and Beyond

Videogame producers in the Middle East face many challenges, which make local game development more difficult than in the US or Europe. This chapter discusses these challenges and identifies the particular production strategies and design features local game developers use in order to adapt to them. In other words, it analyzes the broader cultural, social and political aspects that shape videogame design and production in the Middle East, focusing particularly on the Arab world and Iran. By doing so, it aims to transcend the fragmented character of existing research and propose a theoretical framework for the contextualization of videogame development in the Middle East.

New Book: Visual Culture in the Modern Middle East: Rhetoric of the Image

This book examines the power and role of the image in modern Middle Eastern societies. The essays explore the role and function of image making to highlight the ways in which the images “speak” and what visual languages mean for the construction of Islamic subjectivities, the distribution of power, and the formation of identity and belonging. The book addresses aspects of the visual in the Islamic world, including the presentation of Islam on television; on the internet and other digital media; in banners, posters, murals, and graffiti; and in the satirical press, cartoons, and children’s books.

Iran Elections 2013: Zahra for President

With the Iranian presidential election to be held on 14 June 2013, a campaign Vote4Zahra has been launched. Zahra, a virtual candidate and fictional character of the graphic novel Zahra's Paradise, represents the freedom platform and calls for fair elections. The campaign's goal is to attract attention to the undemocratic political environment in the country.

Book: Diasporas and Diplomacy: Cosmopolitan contact zones at the BBC World Service (1932–2012)

The book analyzes the exercise of British ‘soft power’ through the BBC’s foreign language services, and the diplomatic role played by their diasporic broadcasters. The book offers the first historical and comparative analysis of the ‘corporate cosmopolitanism’ that has characterized the work of the BBC’s international services since the inception of its Empire Service in 1932 – from radio to the Internet.

An Infographic: Internet Censorship in Iran

The Iran Media Program, a project of the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, published an infographic that illustrates the constellation of bodies currently involved in Internet censorship in Iran.

New Report: Archetypes of Iranian Internet Use

The study seeks to complement standard online research techniques by providing a richer picture of Iranian Internet users. The novel research method utilized in this study features 'archetypes' whose characteristics are described in vignettes, and who are defined based on their relationship with the Internet. Taking this approach, the study considers the Internet as an ecosystem, and works toward providing a more realistic narration of the diversity of Iranian Internet users and online environments.

Iran and the Middle East: present and future challenges between international and domestic dynamics

Sep 12, 2013 – Sep 14, 2013
Florence
Italy
Italian Society of Political Science, University of Florence
http://www.sisp.it/convegno/2013/sezioni/73/
Paola Rivetti
politics, Syria, Iran, Egypt, public sphere, Italy, photography
paola.rivetti@dcu.ie
May 10, 2013

New Book: Between the Middle East and the Americas: The Cultural Politics of Diaspora

The book highlights the fraught and ambivalent situation of Arabs/Muslims in the Americas, where they are at once celebrated and demonized, integrated and marginalized, simultaneously invisible and spectacularly visible. The essays cover such themes as Arab hip-hop's transnational imaginary; gender/sexuality and the Muslim digital diaspora; patriotic drama and the media's War on Terror; the global negotiation of the Prophet Mohammad cartoons controversy; the Latin American paradoxes of Turcophobia/Turcophilia; the ambiguities of the bellydancing fad; French and American commodification of Rumi spirituality; the reception of Iranian memoirs as cultural domestication; and the politics of translation of Turkish novels into English.

Reporters Without Borders' Enemies of the Internet Report 2013

Reporters Without Borders releases its Enemies of the Internet 2013 Report. Special Edition: Surveillance, which focuses on "all the monitoring and spying" that is targeting dissidents, activists and citizens in general. Five countries identified as "State Enemies of the Internet" are Syria, China, Iran, Bahrain and Vietnam. Five private-sector companies listed as "Corporate Enemies of the Internet" are Gamma, Trovicor, Hacking Team, Amesys and Blue Coat.
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