Anonymous, 23 Nov 2017
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keyword: Egypt
Ahmed Tohamy, Youth Activism and Social Networks in Egypt, CyberOrient, Vol. 11, Iss. 1, 2017
CyberOrient
Jon Nordenson, Contextualizing Internet Studies: Beyond the Online/Offline Divide, CyberOrient, Vol. 10, Iss. 1, 2016
CyberOrient
Bronwen Robertson, James Marchant, A Safe Refuge? Minorities and the State in Iranian Cyberspace, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 2, 2015
CyberOrient
Robbert Woltering, Rasha Abdulla, Thomas Poell, Bernhard Rieder, Liesbeth Zack, A Page and Its Politics: Situating Kullinā Khālid Saʿīd in Egypt’s Ideological Landscape at the Time of Revolution, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 2, 2015
CyberOrient
Hakim Khatib, 2011 Tahrir Square Demonstrations in Egypt: Semantic Structures That Unify And Divide, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 2, 2015
CyberOrient

Book: Cairo Pop: Youth Music in Contemporary Egypt

The book examines the dominant popular music of Egypt, shababiyya. Scorned or ignored by scholars and older Egyptians alike, shababiyya plays incessantly in Cairo, even while Egyptian youth joined in mass protests against their government, which eventually helped oust longtime Egyptian president Hosni Mubarak in early 2011. Living in Cairo at the time of the revolution, Daniel J. Gilman saw, and more importantly heard, the impact that popular music can have on culture and politics. Here he contributes a richly ethnographic analysis of the relationship between mass-mediated popular music, modernity, and nationalism in the Arab world.

New Book: Translating Dissent: Voices From and With the Egyptian Revolution

Focusing on the Egyptian experience since 2011, this volume brings together a unique group of activists who are able to reflect on the complexities, challenges and limitations of one or more forms of translation and its impact on their ability to interact with a variety of domestic and global audiences. Drawing on a wide range of genres and modalities, from documentary film and subtitling to oral narratives, webcomics and street art, the 18 essays reveal the dynamics and complexities of translation in protest movements across the world. Each unique contribution demonstrates some aspect of the interdependence of these movements and their inevitable reliance on translation to create networks of solidarity. The volume is framed by a substantial introduction by Mona Baker and includes an interview with Egyptian activist and film-maker, Philip Rizk.

Book: Media, Revolution and Politics in Egypt: The Story of an Uprising

The book examines the political and media dynamic in pre-and post-revolution Egypt and what it could mean for the country's democratic transition. We follow events through the period leading up to the 2011 revolution, eighteen days of uprising, military rule, an elected president's year in office, and his ouster by the military. Activism has expanded freedoms of expression only to see those spaces contract with the resurrection of the police state. And with sharpening political divisions, the facts have become amorphous as ideological trends cling to their own narratives of truth.

New Issue of the Arab Media and Society

The online journal Arab Media and Society has published its new issue (Issue 21, 2015) that focuses on pan-Arab TV channels, Egyptian media, and terrorism. Some articles include podcasts.

New Book: Preaching Islamic Renewal: Religious Authority and Media in Contemporary Egypt

The book examines the life and work of Muhammad Mitwalli Sha‘rawi, one of Egypt's most beloved and successful Islamic preachers. His wildly popular TV program aired every Friday for years until his death in 1998. At the height of his career, it was estimated that up to 30 million people tuned in to his show each week. Yet despite his pervasive and continued influence in Egypt and the wider Muslim world, Sha‘rawi was for a long time neglected by academics. While much of the academic literature that focuses on Islam in modern Egypt repeats the claim that traditionally trained Muslim scholars suffered the loss of religious authority, Sha‘rawi is instead an example of a well-trained Sunni scholar who became a national media sensation. As an advisor to the rulers of Egypt as well as the first Arab television preacher, he was one of the most important and controversial religious figures in late-twentieth-century Egypt.
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