Anonymous, 7 Jul 2020
Research on Middle East, Islam and digital media
keyword: Indonesia

Book: Cyberidentities at War: The Moluccan Conflict on the Internet

Based on ethnographic research on the online activities of Christian and Muslim actors in the Moluccan conflict (1999–2003), this study investigates processes of identity construction, community building and evolving conflict dynamics on the Internet. In contributing to conflict and Internet research, this study paves the way for a new cyberanthropology.

New Report: Mapping Digital Media: Indonesia

The Open Society Foundations released its report Mapping Digital Media: Indonesia written by Kuskridho Ambardi, Gilang Parahita, Lisa Lindawati, Adam Sukarno & Nella Aprilia. "The Mapping Digital Media project examines the global opportunities and risks created by the transition from traditional to digital media. Covering 60 countries, the project examines how these changes affect the core democratic service that any media system should provide: news about political, economic, and social affairs."

New Book: Islam and Popular Culture in Indonesia and Malaysia

This book focuses on these forms and the accompanying practices of production, circulation, marketing, and consumption of Islam. Dispelling the notion that Islam is monolithic, militaristic, and primarily Middle Eastern, the book emphasizes its dynamic, contested, and performative nature in contemporary South East Asia. Written by leading scholars alongside media figures, such as Rhoma Irama and Ishadi SK, the case studies although not focused on theology per se, illuminate how Muslims (and non-Muslims) in Indonesia and Malaysia make sense of their lives within an increasingly pervasive culture of Islamic images, texts, film, songs, and narratives.

Imaging Muslim Women in Indonesian Ramadan Soap Operas

This study investigates how Ramadan soap operas have contributed to constructing images of contemporary Islamic culture and urban Muslim women in Indonesia. Using textual analysis and audience ethnography, the author shows how women and Islam have been “framed” by the media in transitional Indonesia.

New Book: Politics and the Media in Twenty-First Century Indonesia: Decade of Democracy

Every political aspirant and activist knows the media are important. But there is little agreement on how an increasingly diversified media operate in post-authoritarian transitions and how they might promote, or impede, the pathways to a sustainable liberal democracy in the 21st century. This book examines the role of the media during Indonesia’s longest experiment with democratisation. It addresses two important and related questions: how is the media being transformed, both in terms of its structure and content, by the changing political economy of Indonesia after the fall of Suharto? And what is the potential impact of this media in enabling or hampering the development of democracy in Indonesia?

New Book: Muslim Societies in the Age of Mass Consumption

In the course of the 20th century, hardly a region in the world has escaped the triumph of global consumerism. Muslim societies are no exception. Globalized brands are pervasive, and the landscapes of consumption are changing at a breathtaking pace. Yet Muslim consumers are not passive victims of the homogenizing forces of globalization. They actively appropriate and adapt the new commodities and spaces of consumption to their own needs and integrate them into their culture. Simultaneously, this culture is reshaped and reinvented to comply with the mechanisms of conspicuous consumption. It is these processes that this volume seeks to address from an interdisciplinary perspective.
 
Hosen, N., Online Fatwa in Indonesia: from Fatwa Shopping to Googling a Kiai. In: Fealy, G.; White, S. (eds.). Expressing Islam: Religious Life and Politics in Indonesia. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies, 2008. abstract
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