Anonymous, 22 Feb 2020
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keyword: social aspects

Book: Arab TV-Audiences: Negotiating Religion and Identity

The empirical based case studies in this interdisciplinary volume explore audience-media relations with a focus on religious identity in different countries such as Egypt, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Great Britain, Germany, Denmark, and the United States. Today the relations between Arab audiences and Arab media are characterised by pluralism and fragmentation. More than a thousand Arab satellite TV channels alongside other new media platforms are offering all kinds of programming. Religion has also found a vital place as a topic in mainstream media or in one of the approximately 135 religious satellite channels that broadcast guidance and entertainment with an Islamic frame of reference. How do Arab audiences make use of mediated religion in negotiations of identity and belonging?
Burçe Çelik, Derya Gurses Tarbuck, Reflections on Oral History: Four Cities on the Social History of Telephone Technology in Turkey, CyberOrient, Vol. 8, Iss. 2, 2014
CyberOrient
Kira C. Allmann, Mobile Revolution: Toward a History of Technology, Telephony and Political Activism in Egypt, CyberOrient, Vol. 8, Iss. 2, 2014
CyberOrient

Book: Gender, Women and the Arab Spring

This book provides a unique investigation into the gender dynamics of the Arab Spring as it unfolded in North Africa. It covers issues such as gender legislation in the post-revolution period, sexual harassment, gender activism, politics and the female body, women and Islamist movements, state feminism, women and political economy, and women’s rights in the context of political transitions. Chapters on Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Libya and Egypt are written by specialist and activists from those countries.

New Book: Bangladesh Cinema and National Identity: In Search of the Modern?

This book investigates the roles of a non-Western "national" film industry in Asia in constructing nationhood and identity within colonial and postcolonial predicaments. Drawing on the idea of cinema as public sphere and the postcolonial notion of formation of the "Bangladesh" nation, interactions between cinema and middle-class Bengali Muslims in different social and political matrices are analyzed. The author explores how the conflict among different social groups turned Bangladesh cinema into a site of contesting identities. In particular, he illustrates the connections between film production and reception in Bangladesh and a variety of nationalist constructions of Bengali Muslim identity.

New Book: Digital Technologies and the Evolving African Newsroom: Towards an African Digital Journalism Epistemology

The book interrogates the changing ecology of news-making in Africa in the context of rapid technological changes in newsrooms as well as in the wider social context of news production. It brings together six contributions drawn from five countries: Egypt, Mozambique, South Africa, Nigeria and Zimbabwe, to explore practices, challenges and professional normative dilemmas emerging with the adoption and appropriation of new technologies. While the studies point to dimensions of localised new technology appropriations as defined by the complex socio-political structures in which African journalists operate, they are not rigidly confined to Africa. They are expressly in dialogue with theoretical observations largely emerging from Western scholarship.

New Book: Routledge Handbook of the Arab Spring: Rethinking Democratization

The book seeks to provide a departure point for ongoing discussion of a fluid phenomenon on a plethora of topics, including: contexts and contests of democratisation, the sweep of the Arab Spring, Egypt, women and the Arab Spring, agents of change and the technology of protest, impact of the Arab Spring in the wider Middle East and further afield.

Book: Virtually Sacred: Myth and Meaning in World of Warcraft and Second Life

The book shows that many residents now use virtual worlds to re-imagine their traditions and work to restore them to authentic sanctity, or else replace religious institutions with virtual communities that provide meaning and purpose to human life. For some online residents, virtual worlds are even keys to a post-human future where technology can help us transcend mortal life. The author argues that World of Warcraft and Second Life are virtually sacred because they do religious work.
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