Anonymous, 22 Feb 2020
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Emily Fekete, The Shifting Nature of Cyberwarfare in Middle Eastern States, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 1, 2015
CyberOrient
Ruth Tsuria, Islamophobia in Online Arab Media, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 1, 2015
CyberOrient
Attila Kovacs, Visual Representation, Propaganda and Cyberspace: The Case of the Palestinian Islamist Movements, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 1, 2015
CyberOrient
Christoph Günther, Presenting the Glossy Look of Warfare in Cyberspace – The Islamic State’s Magazine Dabiq, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 1, 2015
CyberOrient

CFP: Constructing and Consuming Gender through Media (Special Issue of CyberOrient)

CyberOrient: Online Journal of the Virtual Middle East
http://www.cyberorient.net/detail.do?articleId=3682
Vit Sisler
gender, Middle Eastern studies, media studies, communication studies, cultural studies
vit.sisler@ff.cuni.cz
Jan 20, 2016

New Book: Globalized Muslim Youth in the Asia Pacific: Popular Culture in Singapore and Sydney

The book in the Asia Pacific is a sociological study of Muslim youth culture based on original ethnographic fieldwork in two global cities in the Asia Pacific: Singapore and Sydney. Urban young Muslims in Singapore and Sydney face similar everyday challenges, such as their minority status and low socio-economic position relative to the larger society. These are complicated by the broader processes of globalization that bring together the September 11 generation living in the Information Age. Comparing young Muslims living in these secular, multicultural cities across three domains of popular culture - hip-hop music, tattooing, and cultural consumption - this study illuminates the range of attitudes and strategies they adopt to reconcile popular youth culture with piety.

New Report: Documenting the Virtual ‘Caliphate’

Quilliam Foundation released its new report titled Documenting the Virtual ‘Caliphate’ written by Charlie Winter. The report is based upon an exhaustive 30 day survey of Islamic State propaganda conducted across the Islamic month of Shawwal (17 July 2015 – 15 August 2015). A unique methodology was used to compile an archive comprising of a total of 1146 separate propaganda “events” – discrete batches of media from videos and photo essays to audio statements and songs sung a cappella.

New Book: Headlines from the Holy Land: Reporting the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Based on new archive research and original interviews with leading correspondents and diplomats, the book explains why this fiercely contested region exerts such a pull over reporters: those who bring the story to the world. Despite decades of diplomacy, a just and lasting end to the conflict remains as difficult as ever to achieve. Inspired by the author's own experience as the BBC's correspondent in Gaza from 2002-2004, and subsequent research, this book draws on the insight of those who have spent years observing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Starting from a historical perspective, it identifies the challenges the conflict presents for contemporary journalism and diplomacy, and suggests new ways of approaching them.

New Book: Muslim Fashion: Contemporary Style Cultures

The book contextualizes modest wardrobe styling within Islamic and global consumer cultures, interviewing key players including designers, bloggers, shoppers, store clerks, and shop owners. Focusing on Britain, North America, and Turkey, the author provides insights into the ways young Muslim women use multiple fashion systems to negotiate religion, identity, and ethnicity.

New Book: Networked Publics and Digital Contention: The Politics of Everyday Life in Tunisia

The book narrates the story of the co-evolution of technology and society in Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab uprisings. It explores the emergence of a digital culture of contention that helped networked publics negotiate their lived reality, reconfigure power relations, and ultimately redefine the locus of politics. It broadens the focus from narrow debates about the role that social media played in the Arab uprisings toward a fresh understanding of how changes in media affect the state-society relationship over time. Based on extensive fieldwork, in-depth interviews with Internet activists, and immersive analyses of online communication, this book draws our attention away from the tools of political communication and refocuses it on the politics of communication.
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