Anonymous, 22 Feb 2020
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keyword: Yemen

Book: Online Arab Spring: Social Media and Fundamental Change

The book asks why the penetration rate for social media differs in different countries: are psychological and social factors at play? Each chapter considers national identity, the legitimacy crisis, social capital, information and media literacy, and socialization. Religious attitudes are introduced as a key factor in social media, with Arabic countries in the Middle East and North Africa being characterized by Islamic trends. The insight gained will be helpful for analysing online social media effects internationally, and predicting future movements in a social context.

Book: Women and ICT in Africa and the Middle East: Changing Selves, Changing Societies

The book looks at the link between information communication technology and women's empowerment in today's development context, and how ICT can facilitate the pursuit of a better world. Exploring the rich complexity of the contexts in which they live and work, the authors of Women and ICT in Africa and the Middle East offer a multitude of perspectives and experiences, avoiding simplistic answers and solutions. Based on analyses from twenty-one research teams in fourteen countries, this much-needed, human-centred contribution to the fields of gender, development and information communication technology questions, demonstrates and suggests what it takes to wield the emancipatory potential of ICT.

Book: Taking to the Streets: The Transformation of Arab Activism

The book critically examines the conventional wisdom that the 2011 Arab Spring uprisings happened spontaneously and were directed by tech-savvy young revolutionaries. Pairing first-hand observations from activists with the critical perspectives of scholars, the book illuminates the concept of activism as an ongoing process, rather than a sudden burst of defiance. The contributors examine case studies from uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Syria, Bahrain, Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, evaluating the various manifestations of political activism within the context of each country's distinct sociopolitical landscape. The chapters include a country-specific timeline of the first year following the uprisings and conclude with lessons learned.

New Book: The Future of the Arab Spring: Civic Entrepreneurship in Politics, Art, and Technology Startups

The book examines the spirit of civic entrepreneurship that brought once untouchable dictators to their knees and continues to shape the region's political, artistic, and technology sectors. Through interviews with some of the region's leading civic entrepreneurs, including political activists, artists, and technologists, the author broadens popular understandings of recent events in this misunderstood region of the world.

Report: Profiles in Blogging: How Bloggers Around the World Practice Their Craft

The Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) at the National Endowment for Democracy released its report titled Profiles in Blogging: How Bloggers Around the World Practice Their Craft written by Christopher Connell. The paper features bloggers from Saudi Arabia, Cambodia, Ghana, Yemen, Philippines, China, Nepal, and Cuba.

Book: Writing Revolution: The Voices from Tunis to Damascus

This book is a collection of testimony, entirely composed by participants in, and witnesses to, the profound changes shaking their region. Unique amongst material emanating from and about the convulsions in the Arab Middle East, these creative and original writers speak of history, determination and struggle, as well as of political and poetic engagement with questions of identity and activism. This book gives a moving and inspiring insight into the Arab revolutions and uprisings: why they are happening and what might come next.

New Book: Distant Witness: Social Media, the Arab Spring and a Journalism Revolution

In this book, NPR social media chief Andy Carvin – “the man who tweets revolutions” - offers a unique first-person recap of the Arab Spring. Part memoir, part history, the book includes intimate stories of the revolutionaries who fought for freedom on the streets and across the Internet - stories that would have never been recorded before the days of social media.
Samson A. Bezabeh, Mythical Roots, Phantasmic Realities and Transnational Migrants: Yemenis Across the Gulf of Aden, CyberOrient, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, 2012
CyberOrient

New Report: Blogs and Bullets II: New Media and Conflict after the Arab Spring

This report analyzes the role of social media in the Arab Spring protests of 2011–12. It applies a five-level framework for studying and understanding the role of new media in political movements. The authors utilize a unique dataset from bit.ly, the URL shortener commonly associated with Twitter and used by other digital media such as Facebook. With these data, the authors are able to test empirically the claims of “cyberoptimists” and “cyberskeptics” about the role of new media in bringing down autocratic regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya and in spurring protests in other parts of the Arab World, such as Bahrain.
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