Anonymous, 25 Jun 2019
Research on Middle East, Islam and digital media
create content
Do you want to publish your call for papers or article on Digital Islam?
more
newsletter
Register for Newsletter
more
keyword: democracy
Kira C. Allmann, Mobile Revolution: Toward a History of Technology, Telephony and Political Activism in Egypt, CyberOrient, Vol. 8, Iss. 2, 2014
CyberOrient

Book: Gender, Women and the Arab Spring

This book provides a unique investigation into the gender dynamics of the Arab Spring as it unfolded in North Africa. It covers issues such as gender legislation in the post-revolution period, sexual harassment, gender activism, politics and the female body, women and Islamist movements, state feminism, women and political economy, and women’s rights in the context of political transitions. Chapters on Morocco, Tunisia, Algeria, Libya and Egypt are written by specialist and activists from those countries.

New Book: The Networked Young Citizen: Social Media, Political Participation and Civic Engagement

The book examines such themes as the possible effects of social media use upon patterns of political socialization; the potential of social media to ameliorate young people’s political inequality; the role of social media communications for enhancing the civic education curriculum; and evidence for social media manifesting new forms of political engagement and participation by young citizens.

Book: Arab Spring: Uprisings, Powers, Interventions

The book delves beneath the seemingly chaotic nature of events to explore the structural dynamics underpinning popular resistance and their support or suppression. It moves beyond what has usually been defined as Arab Spring nations to include critical views on Bahrain, the Palestinian territories, and Turkey. The research and analysis presented explores not just the immediate protests, but also the historical realization, appropriation, and even institutionalization of these critical voices, as well as the role of international criminal law and legal exceptionalism in authorizing humanitarian interventions.

Book: Understanding Tahrir Square: What Transitions Elsewhere Can Teach Us about the Prospects for Arab Democracy

The book puts the Arab Spring in comparative perspective. It reveals how globalization and other changes are upending the expectations of citizens everywhere about the relationship between citizen and state. Separate chapters examine the experiences of countries in the former Eastern bloc, in the Muslim-majority states of Asia, in Latin America, and in Sub-Saharan Africa during the recent Third Wave of democratization. What these cases show is that, at the end of the day, democracy requires democrats.

Book: Social Media During the Egyptian Revolution: A Study of Collective Identity and Organizational Function of Facebook & Co

This study identifies and analyses mechanisms of use and potential intermediary effects of social media in connection with other driving factors of mass demonstrations that led to the fall of the Mubarak regime in early 2011. Semi-structured focus interviews were carried out with social media activists in Cairo between November 20th and 24th, 2011. The qualitative content analysis of eight interviews allowed for the identification of relevant categories and sub-categories as well as possible connections between them. Additionally, a thorough analysis of the Egyptian socio-economic, political and media system in the years leading up to the revolution provides the basis for valuable and contextual conclusions.

Book: Taking to the Streets: The Transformation of Arab Activism

The book critically examines the conventional wisdom that the 2011 Arab Spring uprisings happened spontaneously and were directed by tech-savvy young revolutionaries. Pairing first-hand observations from activists with the critical perspectives of scholars, the book illuminates the concept of activism as an ongoing process, rather than a sudden burst of defiance. The contributors examine case studies from uprisings in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Yemen, Syria, Bahrain, Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait, and Saudi Arabia, evaluating the various manifestations of political activism within the context of each country's distinct sociopolitical landscape. The chapters include a country-specific timeline of the first year following the uprisings and conclude with lessons learned.

New Book: Revolution in the Age of Social Media: The Egyptian Popular Insurrection and the Internet

The book provides piercing insights into the ongoing struggles between people and power in the digital age. Egypt’s 25 January revolution was triggered by a Facebook page and played out both in virtual spaces and the streets. Social media serves as a space of liberation, but it also functions as an arena where competing forces vie over the minds of the young as they battle over ideas as important as the nature of freedom and the place of the rising generation in the political order.

New Report: Freedom of the Press 2014: Press Freedom at the Lowest Level in a Decade

Freedom House released its new report titled Freedom of the Press 2014 which says that the freedom of the press has fallen to its lowest level in over a decade. In the MENA region the improvements took place in Algeria, Yemen, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and Israel.

New Report: PakVotes: A Social Media Experiment in Elections Monitoring

The United States Institute of Peace released a brief PakVotes: A Social Media Experiment in Elections Monitoring authored by Nadia Naviwala. The report analyzes the effectiveness of PakVotes, an experimental project run by a Pakistani NGO and supported by USIP, that brought social media platforms together with a network of reporters to track violence during Pakistan’s 2013 elections.
page 2 of 14138 items