Anonymous, 7 Jul 2020
Research on Middle East, Islam and digital media
keyword: Judaism

New Issue of the Journal of Media and Religion

Journal of Media and Religion released its new issue (Vol. 13, Issue 2, 2014). The issue looks at the portrayal of sharia in American network television media, or at how Islam was reported by Pre-Arab Spring English-language Egyptian media.

New Book: Modest Fashion: Styling Bodies, Mediating Faith

Studying consumers and producers, retailers and bloggers, this book provides an up to the minute account of the art of dressing modestly - and fashionably. Leading scholars in the area, along with journalists, fashion designers, entrepreneurs and bloggers discuss the emergence of a niche market for modest fashion among and between Jewish, Christian and Muslim faith groups as well as secular dressers. Crossing creeds and cultures, analysing commentary alongside commerce, the book probes the personal and the political as well as religious, aesthetic and economic implications of contemporary dress practices and the debates that surround them.

New Book: Media, Religion and Gender: Key Issues and New Challenges

This book presents a selection of eminent current scholarship that explores the role gender plays when religion, media use and values in contemporary society interact. It surveys the development of research on media, religion and culture through the lens of key theoretical and methodological issues and debates within gender studies.

New Book: Digital Religion: Understanding Religious Practice in New Media Worlds

The book offers a critical and systematic survey of the study of religion and new media. It covers religious engagement with a wide range of new media forms and highlights examples of new media engagement in all five of the major world religions. From cell phones and video games to blogs and Second Life, the book considers the theoretical, ethical and theological issues raised.

New Book: Apocalyptic AI: Visions of Heaven in Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, and Virtual Reality

Drawing on interviews with roboticists and AI researchers and with devotees of the online game Second Life, among others, the author illuminates the ideas of such advocates of Apocalyptic AI as Hans Moravec and Ray Kurzweil. He reveals that the rhetoric of Apocalyptic AI is strikingly similar to that of the apocalyptic traditions of Judaism and Christianity. In both systems, the believer is trapped in a dualistic universe and expects a resolution in which he or she will be translated to a transcendent new world and live forever in a glorified new body.

New Book: God, Jews and the Media: Religion and Israel’s Media

This book delves into the complex relationship between Judaism and the mass media to provide a comprehensive examination of modern Jewish identity in the information age. Covering Israel as well as the Diaspora populations of the US and UK, the author looks at journalism, broadcasting, advertising and the internet to give a wide-ranging analysis of how the Jewish religion and Jewish people have been influenced by the media age.

When Religion Meets New Media

This lively book focuses on how different Jewish, Muslim, and Christian communities engage with new media. Rather than simply reject or accept new media, religious communities negotiate complex relationships with these technologies in light of their history and beliefs. Heidi Campbell suggests a method for studying these processes she calls the "religious-social shaping of technology" and students are asked to consider four key areas: religious tradition and history; contemporary community values and priorities; negotiation and innovating technology in light of the community; communal discourses applied to justify use.

Technology and Religion: Special Issue of the Masaryk University Journal of Law and Technology

The special issue of the Masaryk University Journal of Law and Technology is out. As guest editors, Robert M. Geraci and I have tried to put together unique collection of articles on technology and religion. Three of the articles published deal with the production of Islamic knowledge for European Muslim minorities on the Internet – namely Carmen Becker’s article on German and Dutch Salafi online forums, Jens Kutscher’s article on online muftis, and my essay on marriage and divorce fatwas online.

Making the Internet Kosher: Orthodox (Haredi) Jews and their approach to the World Wide Web

This article surveys the approach of Orthodox Judaism – especially the Haredi (Ultra-Orthodox) Judaism – to the Internet. In the introduction we compare the approach of the Abrahamic religions to the Internet. Then we focus on the Haredi community (especially in the contemporary State of Israel) and their specific approach to the Internet. This article argues that the use of the Internet, although officially banned by many Haredi Rabbis, is in fact tolerated on a pragmatic basis. We also survey which kind of “protection against secular threads” the Haredim use (filtering software, Holy Shabbat protection). In the last part of this article the role of the Internet in Israeli religious politics, and by its uses by fundamentalist and radical Jewish groups, is surveyed.
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