Anonymous, 22 Feb 2020
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keyword: activism

Winners of The BOBs/Deutsche Welle Blog Awards 2013

Germany’s international broadcaster Deutsche Welle announced the winners of its annual The BOBs/Deutsche Welle Blog Awards. The Best Blog Award went to Li Chengpeng, a Chinese blogger and columnist. There were six Jury Awards categories (Best Blog, Best Innovation, Best Social Activism, Reporters Without Borders Award, Global Media Forum Award, and Most Creative & Original), six User Prizes in the same categories, and 14 language-specific User Prizes for Best Blogs.

New Book: Revolution Graffiti: Street Art of the New Egypt

The photographer Mia Gröndahl has followed and documented the constantly and rapidly changing graffiti art of the new Egypt from its beginnings, and here in more than 400 full-color images celebrates the imagination, the skill, the humor, and the political will of the young artists and activists who have claimed the walls of Cairo and other Egyptian cities as their canvas.

Book: The Technology Of Nonviolence: Social Media and Violence Prevention

Once peacekeeping was the purview of international observers, but today local citizens take violence prevention into their own hands. These local approaches often involve technology--including the use of digital mapping, crowdsourcing, and mathematical pattern recognition to identify likely locations of violence--but, as the author shows, technological advances are of little value unless they are used by a trained cadre of community organizers.

New Book: North Africa’s Arab Spring

This book addresses issues surrounding the evolution of the Arab Spring in North Africa. After a general introduction and explanation of the events on a region-wide basis, it turns to examine aspects of each of the countries concerned. The role of the Muslim Brotherhood during the Nasser regime and in the contemporary situation is compared, together with an analysis of the emergence of new political parties in Egypt. The book analyses the links between social media and satellite television during the revolution in Egypt. This is followed by a study of the intellectual and cultural background to the Tunisian revolution and an analysis of the new political parties in Tunisia. It also looks at the revolution process in Libya and concludes with a study of why there was no revolution in Algeria and how the Moroccan monarchy was able to sideline those who challenged it at the price of constitutional changes that are essentially cosmetic.

New Book: Transformations in Egyptian Journalism

The author considers emerging visions of journalism in Egypt. In this book she charts recent transformations in Egyptian journalism, exploring diverse approaches to converged media and the place of participatory cross-media networks in expanding and developing the country's body of professional journalists. She analyses journalists' initiatives for restructuring publicly-owned media and securing a safe and open environment in which to work.

Book: Dissent and Revolution in a Digital Age: Social Media, Blogging and Activism in Egypt

The book tracks the rocky path taken by Egyptian bloggers operating in Mubarak's authoritarian regime to illustrate how the state monopoly on information was eroded, making space for dissent and digital activism. David Faris argues that it was circumstances particular to Egypt, more than the 'spark' from Tunisia, that allowed the revolution to take off: namely blogging and digital activism stretching back into the 1990s, combined with sustained and numerous protest movements and an independent press.

Reporters Without Borders' Enemies of the Internet Report 2013

Reporters Without Borders releases its Enemies of the Internet 2013 Report. Special Edition: Surveillance, which focuses on "all the monitoring and spying" that is targeting dissidents, activists and citizens in general. Five countries identified as "State Enemies of the Internet" are Syria, China, Iran, Bahrain and Vietnam. Five private-sector companies listed as "Corporate Enemies of the Internet" are Gamma, Trovicor, Hacking Team, Amesys and Blue Coat.

New Book: The Arab Spring: Critical Analyses

This volume provides a wealth of in-depth, country-specific analyses of the Arab Spring, in addition to works that examine the larger theoretical framework and socio-political implications of events. The studies and readings included here deal with the countries affected directly by the Arab Spring in addition to ones that focus on meta-trends in the Arab world: the unprecedented mass movements and attendant phenomena, from the mass mobilizations of social media to the effectiveness of non-violent resistance.

New Book: Democracy's Fourth Wave? Digital Media and the Arab Spring

The book examines the complex role of the Internet, mobile phones, and social networking applications in the Arab Spring. Examining digital media access, level of grievance, and levels of protest for popular democratization in 16 countries in the Middle East and North Africa, Howard and Hussain conclude that digital media was neither the most nor the least important cause of the Arab Spring. Instead, they illustrate a complex web of conjoined causal factors for social mobilization.
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