Anonymous, 17 Aug 2018
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keyword: terrorism

New Issue of the Arab Media and Society

The online journal Arab Media and Society has published its new issue (Issue 21, 2015) that focuses on pan-Arab TV channels, Egyptian media, and terrorism. Some articles include podcasts.
Emily Fekete, The Shifting Nature of Cyberwarfare in Middle Eastern States, CyberOrient, Vol. 9, Iss. 1, 2015
CyberOrient

New Book: ‘We Love Death As You Love Life’: Britain's Suburban Terrorists

This book offers an insight into the motivations behind Mohammed Siddique Khan and his group, as well as the hundreds of young British Muslims who have been drawn by jihadist ideas to fight on battlefields at home and abroad. From the arrival of immigrant communities to the UK and the establishment of diasporas with strong ethnic connections to the Middle East and South Asia, to the arrival of jihadist warriors fresh from the anti-Soviet war in Afghanistan, Pantucci looks at the history that came before Mohammed Siddique Khan and places his action within its larger context.

Book: Terrorist Transgressions: Gender and the Visual Culture of the Terrorist

This book explores how the terrorist is represented and the processes through which they have subsumed so many popular cultural myths. It discusses how a terrorist's capacity for destruction can be linked to their appropriation or rejection of gender stereotypes and includes essays on masculinities in post-conflict Northern Ireland, gendered insurgency, the colonial state of exception, Oedipal rivalries, the German Red Army Faction, masculinity in Fox television saga 24 and Anders Behring Breivik's sartorial code. In addition to essays that debate the broad imagery that surrounds terrorism's visual cultures it includes pages by artists who question the role of censorship and the physiognomy of evil.

Book: Branding Terror: The Logotypes and Iconography of Insurgent Groups and Terrorist Organizations

The book is the first comprehensive survey of the visual identity of the world’s major terrorist organizations, from al-Qaeda and the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine to the Tamil Tigers. Each of the 60-plus entries contains a concise description of the group’s ideology, leadership and modus operandi, and a brief timeline of events. The group’s branding – the symbolism, colours and typography of its logo and flag – is then analysed in detail. Branding Terror does not seek to make any political statements; rather, it offers insight into an understudied area of counter-intelligence, and provides an original and provocative source of inspiration for graphic designers.

Book: The Relationship between Rhetoric and Terrorist Violence

This book presents findings from a research which examined whether linguistic content analysis can indicate whether groups will engage in terrorist violence. Specifically, this project brought together several researchers who have developed manual and automated coding systems to analyse documents issued by Central al Qa’ida and al Qa’ida in the Arabian Peninsula, and two non-terrorist comparison groups. The intention has been to test whether linguistic content analysis can first, distinguish the language of terrorist groups from that of non-terrorist groups and second, provide indicators of specific terrorist attacks.

New Book: Media, Myth and Terrorism: A discourse-mythological analysis of the 'Blitz Spirit' in British Newspaper Responses to the July 7th Bombings

The book provides a rigorous case study of Blitz mythology in British newspaper responses to the July 7th bombings. Considering how the press, politicians and members of the public were caught up in popular accounts of Britain's past, Kelsey explores the ideological battleground that took place in the weeks following the bombings as the myth of the Blitz was invoked. By providing conceptual discussions of myth, discourse, and ideology, Kelsey proposes a discourse-mythological framework designed for analysing discursive constructions of mythology. In doing so, this research considers multiple recontextualisations of the Blitz myth when popular memories of 1940 recurred in 2005.

New Book: Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People

The author, noting that only Native Americans have been more relentlessly smeared on the silver screen, painstakingly makes his case that "Arab" has remained Hollywood's shameless shorthand for "bad guy," long after the movie industry has shifted its portrayal of other minority groups. In this comprehensive study of over one thousand films, arranged alphabetically in such chapters as "Villains," "Sheikhs," "Cameos," and "Cliffhangers," Shaheen documents the tendency to portray Muslim Arabs as Public Enemy #1-brutal, heartless, uncivilized Others bent on terrorizing civilized Westerners. Shaheen examines how and why such a stereotype has grown and spread in the film industry and what may be done to change Hollywood's defamation of Arabs.

New Book: Introduction to Cyber-Warfare: A Multidisciplinary Approach

The book presents an insider's look into the world of cyber-warfare through the use of recent case studies. The book examines the issues related to cyber warfare not only from a computer science perspective but from military, sociological, and scientific perspectives as well. It shows how cyber-warfare has been performed in the past as well as why various actors rely on this new means of warfare and what steps can be taken to prevent it.

New Book: Digital Media and Reporting Conflict: Blogging and the BBC’s Coverage of War and Terrorism

This book explores the impact of new forms of online reporting on the BBC’s coverage of war and terrorism. Informed by the views of over 100 BBC staff at all levels of the corporation, Bennett captures journalists’ shifting attitudes towards blogs and internet sources used to cover wars and other conflicts. He argues that the BBC’s practices and values are fundamentally evolving in response to the challenges of immediate digital publication. Ongoing challenges for journalism in the online media environment are identified: maintaining impartiality in the face of calls for more open personal journalism; ensuring accuracy when the power of the "former audience" allows news to break at speed; and overcoming the limits of the scale of the BBC’s news operation in order to meet the demands to present news as conversation.
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