Anonymous, 5 Apr 2020
Research on Middle East, Islam and digital media
keyword: identity

Book: A Society of Young Women: Opportunities of Place, Power, and Reform in Saudi Arabia

The book joins young urban women in their daily lives—in the workplace, on the female university campus, at the mall—to show how these women are transforming Saudi cities from within and creating their own urban, professional, consumerist lifestyles.

New Issue of the Journal of Media and Religion

Journal of Media and Religion released its new issue (Vol. 13, Issue 2, 2014). The issue looks at the portrayal of sharia in American network television media, or at how Islam was reported by Pre-Arab Spring English-language Egyptian media.

Book: Joyriding in Riyadh: Oil, Urbanism, and Road Revolt

The book explores the social fabric of the city and connects it to Saudi Arabia's recent history. Car drifting emerged after Riyadh was planned, and oil became the main driver of the economy. For young rural migrants, it was a way to reclaim alienating and threatening urban spaces. For the Saudi state, it jeopardized its most basic operations: managing public spaces and enforcing law and order. A police crackdown soon targeted car drifting, feeding a nationwide moral panic led by religious activists who framed youth culture as a public issue. The book retraces the politicization of Riyadh youth and shows that, far from being a marginal event, car drifting is embedded in the country's social violence and economic inequality.

Book: Cyberidentities at War: The Moluccan Conflict on the Internet

Based on ethnographic research on the online activities of Christian and Muslim actors in the Moluccan conflict (1999–2003), this study investigates processes of identity construction, community building and evolving conflict dynamics on the Internet. In contributing to conflict and Internet research, this study paves the way for a new cyberanthropology.

New Book: Re-Imagining the Other: Culture, Media, and Western-Muslim Intersections

The book examines the ways in which knowledge is manipulated by dominant Western and Muslim discourses. Authors from several disciplines study how the two societies have constructed images of each other in historical and contemporary times. The complexities and subtleties of their mutually productive relationship are overshadowed by portrayals of unremitting clash, thus serving as encouragement for the promotion of war and terrorism. The book proposes specific approaches to re-imagine the Other in order to mitigate Western-Muslim conflict.

New Book: Media Framing of the Muslim World: Conflicts, Crises and Contexts

The book is an account of how news about Islam and the Muslim world is produced and consumed, and how it impacts on relations between Islam and the West. The topics addressed in this book include how news values and media frames contribute to Western audiences' perceptions and understandings of Islam and Muslims; the extent to which historic conceptions of orientalism remain salient and are manifested in Islamophobia; how reporting on terrorism and asylum seekers impacts on public opinion and policy making; how the relationship between mass and social media contribute to the changing socio-political landscape of the Middle East and our understanding of the Muslim world; and how journalism and audiences have evolved in the decade since 9/11.

Book: Watching Arabic Television in Europe: From Diaspora to Hybrid Citizens

Anti-immigrant sentiment is on the rise in Europe, focused on Islam and on Arabs, and manifested in increasingly rigorous immigration regimes. What are Arabic Europeans watching on television and how does it affect their identities as Europeans? New quantitative and qualitative evidence from seven capitals shows that, far from being isolated in ethnic media ghettoes, they are critical news consumers in Arabic and European languages. Arabic speakers from the Maghreb, concentrated in Paris, Amsterdam and Madrid are bicultural, focusing on media in their European and Arabic homelands. Other Middle Eastern Arabic speakers are more transnational in their media. The author argues that hybrid television cultures of the sort found among Arabic speakers in Europe enhance, rather than detract from, the culture of civic life in Europe.

International WAFAW Conference: "The Role of Diasporas, Migrants, and Exiles in the Arab Revolutions and Political Transitions"

Oct 15, 2014 – Oct 17, 2014
Tunis
When Authoritarianism Fails In The Arab World (WAFAW)
http://www.wafaw.org/2014/03/call-for-papers-international-conference/
Middle Eastern studies, activism, politics, identity, Arab Spring
DiasporaTunis2014@gmail.com
May 15, 2014
 
Thames, Ryan Clark, Religion as Resource in Digital Games. Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet (vol. 5, 2014) abstract full text PDF

Book: Targeted Transnationals: The State, the Media, and Arab Canadians

With an eye to the implications for human rights, multiculturalism, and integration, the contributors to this book draw on qualitative interviews, policy, and media analysis to examine state practices towards, and media representations of, Arab Canadians. Part 1 looks at state practices and policies and illustrates how the Canadian government has repeatedly targeted Arab Canadians. Part 2 examines how changing policy frameworks have intersected with representations of, and public discourses on, Arab Canadians. Part 3 analyzes the voices and resistance strategies of Arab-Canadians as they struggle against negative representations.
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