Anonymous, 22 Feb 2020
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Burçe Çelik, The History of Telephony in the Non-West, CyberOrient, Vol. 8, Iss. 2, 2014
CyberOrient

Book: Arab TV-Audiences: Negotiating Religion and Identity

The empirical based case studies in this interdisciplinary volume explore audience-media relations with a focus on religious identity in different countries such as Egypt, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Great Britain, Germany, Denmark, and the United States. Today the relations between Arab audiences and Arab media are characterised by pluralism and fragmentation. More than a thousand Arab satellite TV channels alongside other new media platforms are offering all kinds of programming. Religion has also found a vital place as a topic in mainstream media or in one of the approximately 135 religious satellite channels that broadcast guidance and entertainment with an Islamic frame of reference. How do Arab audiences make use of mediated religion in negotiations of identity and belonging?
Burçe Çelik, Derya Gurses Tarbuck, Reflections on Oral History: Four Cities on the Social History of Telephone Technology in Turkey, CyberOrient, Vol. 8, Iss. 2, 2014
CyberOrient

New Book: Bangladesh Cinema and National Identity: In Search of the Modern?

This book investigates the roles of a non-Western "national" film industry in Asia in constructing nationhood and identity within colonial and postcolonial predicaments. Drawing on the idea of cinema as public sphere and the postcolonial notion of formation of the "Bangladesh" nation, interactions between cinema and middle-class Bengali Muslims in different social and political matrices are analyzed. The author explores how the conflict among different social groups turned Bangladesh cinema into a site of contesting identities. In particular, he illustrates the connections between film production and reception in Bangladesh and a variety of nationalist constructions of Bengali Muslim identity.

Book: Virtually Sacred: Myth and Meaning in World of Warcraft and Second Life

The book shows that many residents now use virtual worlds to re-imagine their traditions and work to restore them to authentic sanctity, or else replace religious institutions with virtual communities that provide meaning and purpose to human life. For some online residents, virtual worlds are even keys to a post-human future where technology can help us transcend mortal life. The author argues that World of Warcraft and Second Life are virtually sacred because they do religious work.

New Book: Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People

The author, noting that only Native Americans have been more relentlessly smeared on the silver screen, painstakingly makes his case that "Arab" has remained Hollywood's shameless shorthand for "bad guy," long after the movie industry has shifted its portrayal of other minority groups. In this comprehensive study of over one thousand films, arranged alphabetically in such chapters as "Villains," "Sheikhs," "Cameos," and "Cliffhangers," Shaheen documents the tendency to portray Muslim Arabs as Public Enemy #1-brutal, heartless, uncivilized Others bent on terrorizing civilized Westerners. Shaheen examines how and why such a stereotype has grown and spread in the film industry and what may be done to change Hollywood's defamation of Arabs.

Book: Digital Media and Society: Transforming Economics, Politics and Social Practices

Referencing key contemporary debates on issues such as surveillance, identity, the global financial crisis, the digital divide and Internet politics, this book is a critical intervention in discussions on the impact of the proliferation of digital media technologies on politics, the economy and social practices. Divided into three parts, the first highlights the way in which digital media challenges normative conceptions of the public sphere and discusses this in relation to the creation of new forms of knowledge through the digitization of scholarly resources and the impact of digital media on traditional conceptions of identity. The second part focuses on the digital economy, emphasizing the opportunities it affords through the creative industries, as well as the threat posed by the computerization of the financial industry, and the third part focuses on uses of digital media through a number of case studies relating to online reading, the new social movements, surveillance and the developing world.

Book: A Society of Young Women: Opportunities of Place, Power, and Reform in Saudi Arabia

The book joins young urban women in their daily lives—in the workplace, on the female university campus, at the mall—to show how these women are transforming Saudi cities from within and creating their own urban, professional, consumerist lifestyles.

New Issue of the Journal of Media and Religion

Journal of Media and Religion released its new issue (Vol. 13, Issue 2, 2014). The issue looks at the portrayal of sharia in American network television media, or at how Islam was reported by Pre-Arab Spring English-language Egyptian media.
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