Anonymous, 22 Jul 2019
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Mohammed El-Nawawy and Sahar Khamis, Cyberactivists Paving the Way for the Arab Spring: Voices from Egypt, Tunisia and Libya, CyberOrient, Vol. 6, Iss. 2, 2012
CyberOrient

New Book: National Broadcasting and State Policy in Arab Countries

The book provides a state-of-the-art analysis of the situation of national television, and address the following central question: What do the Arab national broadcastings say today about public policy in this sector and about political opening? The contributors to this volume deal with the reforms of public broadcasting organizations, relationships between national, private and public actors in this sector, and finally the evolution, perspectives and issues of national broadcasting.
Marek Cejka, Review: The Arab Revolution: The Lessons from the Democratic Uprising, CyberOrient, Vol. 6, Iss. 1, 2012
CyberOrient
 
Aday, Sean; Farrell, Henry; Lynch, Marc; Sides, John; Freelon, Deen, Blogs and Bullets II: New Media and Conflict after the Arab Spring. Peaceworks, Number 80, United States Institute of Peace, 2012 abstract PDF

New Report: Blogs and Bullets II: New Media and Conflict after the Arab Spring

This report analyzes the role of social media in the Arab Spring protests of 2011–12. It applies a five-level framework for studying and understanding the role of new media in political movements. The authors utilize a unique dataset from bit.ly, the URL shortener commonly associated with Twitter and used by other digital media such as Facebook. With these data, the authors are able to test empirically the claims of “cyberoptimists” and “cyberskeptics” about the role of new media in bringing down autocratic regimes in Tunisia, Egypt, and Libya and in spurring protests in other parts of the Arab World, such as Bahrain.

Reporters Without Borders' Internet Enemies Report 2012

Reporters Without Borders releases its "Internet Enemies Report 2012", a 72-page report focused on online freedom of expression and cyber censorship. Countries listed as "Internet Enemies" in 2012 are Bahrain, Belarus, Burma, China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam. Countries “Under Surveillance” are Australia, Egypt, Eritrea, France, India, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Russia, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia, Turkey and United Arab Emirates, while Libya and Venezuela had been dropped from the list.

ARTE TV's Project: The Arab World in Revolution(s)

ARTE TV launched its new online project The Arab World in Revolution(s) which includes special TV programmes (Arab cinema movies and documentaries), video portraits of citizens from the region, interviews, cartoons and blogs (like blog on Tunisia's elections).

Reporters Without Borders' Internet Enemies Report 2011

Reporters Without Borders published a new report on online freedom of expression and cyber censorship, the report is titled Internet Enemies. Countries labeled as "Internet Enemies" in 2011 are Burma, China, Cuba, Iran, North Korea, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan and Vietnam. Tunisia and Egypt have been dropped from the “Internet Enemies” list and added to the “Under Surveillance” list. Other countries in this category are (for various reasons) Australia, Bahrain, Belarus, Eritrea, France, Libya, Malaysia, Russia, South Korea, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates and Venezuela. The 100-page report gives detailed information on the current situation in these countries.

Gaddafi, Mubarak and Ben Ali Meet in Satirical Cartoons

Kharabeesh, the producer of Arabic mini cartoon shows available online and through mobile networks, answers the current upheavals in the North Africa with their cartoons featuring Gaddafi, Mubarak, Ben Ali, and also Bouteflika, Saleh and King Abdullah acting in minor roles. They mock Ben Ali's flight odyssey into exile, Mubarak glued on his chair or Gaddafi's characteristic speech style.
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