Anonymous, 3 Jun 2020
Research on Middle East, Islam and digital media
keyword: Internet

Report: The Arab World Online: Trends in Internet Usage in the Arab Region

The Dubai School of Government in cooperation with the online recruitment website Bayt.com released its white paper The Arab World Online: Trends in Internet Usage in the Arab Region, co-authored by Sara Alshaer and Fadi Salem. The report is based on a survey conducted with residents from 22 countries in March 2013.

Book: Diasporas and Diplomacy: Cosmopolitan contact zones at the BBC World Service (1932–2012)

The book analyzes the exercise of British ‘soft power’ through the BBC’s foreign language services, and the diplomatic role played by their diasporic broadcasters. The book offers the first historical and comparative analysis of the ‘corporate cosmopolitanism’ that has characterized the work of the BBC’s international services since the inception of its Empire Service in 1932 – from radio to the Internet.

New Book: Egyptian Revolution 2.0: Political Blogging, Civic Engagement, and Citizen Journalism

This book sheds light on the growing phenomenon of cyberactivism in the Arab world, with a special focus on the Egyptian political blogosphere and its role in paving the way to democratization and socio-political change in Egypt, which culminated in Egypt's historical popular revolution on Jan. 25, 2011. In doing so, it examines the relevance and applicability of the concepts of citizen journalism and civic engagement to the discourses and deliberations in five of the most popular political blogs in Egypt, through exploring the potential connection between virtual activism, as represented in the postings on these blogs, and real activism in Egyptian political life, as represented in the calls for social, economic and political reform on the streets.

An Infographic: Internet Censorship in Iran

The Iran Media Program, a project of the Center for Global Communication Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania, published an infographic that illustrates the constellation of bodies currently involved in Internet censorship in Iran.

New Report: Archetypes of Iranian Internet Use

The study seeks to complement standard online research techniques by providing a richer picture of Iranian Internet users. The novel research method utilized in this study features 'archetypes' whose characteristics are described in vignettes, and who are defined based on their relationship with the Internet. Taking this approach, the study considers the Internet as an ecosystem, and works toward providing a more realistic narration of the diversity of Iranian Internet users and online environments.

Survey: Media Use in the Middle East

The Northwestern University in Qatar conducted its Media Use in the Middle East survey and made the findings available online on an interactive website. the survey covers eight countries: Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Tunisia, and the UAE.

Report: New Technology and the Prevention of Violence and Conflict

The International Peace Institute, in cooperation with the United Nations Development Programme and the United States Agency for International Development, released its report titled New Technology and the Prevention of Violence and Conflict, edited by Francesco Mancini.

New Book: North Africa’s Arab Spring

This book addresses issues surrounding the evolution of the Arab Spring in North Africa. After a general introduction and explanation of the events on a region-wide basis, it turns to examine aspects of each of the countries concerned. The role of the Muslim Brotherhood during the Nasser regime and in the contemporary situation is compared, together with an analysis of the emergence of new political parties in Egypt. The book analyses the links between social media and satellite television during the revolution in Egypt. This is followed by a study of the intellectual and cultural background to the Tunisian revolution and an analysis of the new political parties in Tunisia. It also looks at the revolution process in Libya and concludes with a study of why there was no revolution in Algeria and how the Moroccan monarchy was able to sideline those who challenged it at the price of constitutional changes that are essentially cosmetic.

New Book: Digital Media and Reporting Conflict: Blogging and the BBC’s Coverage of War and Terrorism

This book explores the impact of new forms of online reporting on the BBC’s coverage of war and terrorism. Informed by the views of over 100 BBC staff at all levels of the corporation, Bennett captures journalists’ shifting attitudes towards blogs and internet sources used to cover wars and other conflicts. He argues that the BBC’s practices and values are fundamentally evolving in response to the challenges of immediate digital publication. Ongoing challenges for journalism in the online media environment are identified: maintaining impartiality in the face of calls for more open personal journalism; ensuring accuracy when the power of the "former audience" allows news to break at speed; and overcoming the limits of the scale of the BBC’s news operation in order to meet the demands to present news as conversation.
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