Anonymous, 11 Dec 2018
Research on Middle East, Islam and digital media
create content
Do you want to publish your call for papers or article on Digital Islam?
more
newsletter
Register for Newsletter
more

New Book: Muhammad in the Digital Age

The book deals with topics such as the 2005 cartoon controversy in Denmark and the infamous 2012 movie trailer “Innocence of Muslims” that some believe sparked the attacks on the US consulate in Benghazi, as well as how the digitization of ancient texts have allowed the origins of Islam to be studied in new ways. Other essays examine how Muhammad’s wives have been represented in various online sources, including a web comic; the contrasting depictions of Muhammad as both a warrior and peacemaker; and how the widespread distribution of “the look” of Islamic terrorists has led to attacks on Sikhs, whose only point of resemblance to them may be a full beard. These findings illuminate the role of the Internet in forms of representation, advocacy, and engagement concerning Islam and Muslims in our world today.

New Book: Globalized Muslim Youth in the Asia Pacific: Popular Culture in Singapore and Sydney

The book in the Asia Pacific is a sociological study of Muslim youth culture based on original ethnographic fieldwork in two global cities in the Asia Pacific: Singapore and Sydney. Urban young Muslims in Singapore and Sydney face similar everyday challenges, such as their minority status and low socio-economic position relative to the larger society. These are complicated by the broader processes of globalization that bring together the September 11 generation living in the Information Age. Comparing young Muslims living in these secular, multicultural cities across three domains of popular culture - hip-hop music, tattooing, and cultural consumption - this study illuminates the range of attitudes and strategies they adopt to reconcile popular youth culture with piety.

New Book: Digital Culture and Religion in Asia

This book critically analyses the functions and interconnectedness between religion and digital media in a range of East Asian countries. It discusses both how religious organizations make use of new technologies, and also explores how new technologies are reshaping religion in novel and interesting ways. Based on extensive research, the book focuses in particular on Christianity in South Korea, Neo-Shintoism in Japan, Falun Gong in China and Islam in Southeast Asia. Offering a comparative perspective on a broad range of media practices including video gaming, virtual worship, social networking and online testimonials, the book also investigates the idea that use of technology in itself mirrors religious practices.

New Report: Documenting the Virtual ‘Caliphate’

Quilliam Foundation released its new report titled Documenting the Virtual ‘Caliphate’ written by Charlie Winter. The report is based upon an exhaustive 30 day survey of Islamic State propaganda conducted across the Islamic month of Shawwal (17 July 2015 – 15 August 2015). A unique methodology was used to compile an archive comprising of a total of 1146 separate propaganda “events” – discrete batches of media from videos and photo essays to audio statements and songs sung a cappella.

New Book: Headlines from the Holy Land: Reporting the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

Based on new archive research and original interviews with leading correspondents and diplomats, the book explains why this fiercely contested region exerts such a pull over reporters: those who bring the story to the world. Despite decades of diplomacy, a just and lasting end to the conflict remains as difficult as ever to achieve. Inspired by the author's own experience as the BBC's correspondent in Gaza from 2002-2004, and subsequent research, this book draws on the insight of those who have spent years observing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Starting from a historical perspective, it identifies the challenges the conflict presents for contemporary journalism and diplomacy, and suggests new ways of approaching them.

New Book: Muslim Fashion: Contemporary Style Cultures

The book contextualizes modest wardrobe styling within Islamic and global consumer cultures, interviewing key players including designers, bloggers, shoppers, store clerks, and shop owners. Focusing on Britain, North America, and Turkey, the author provides insights into the ways young Muslim women use multiple fashion systems to negotiate religion, identity, and ethnicity.

New Book: Networked Publics and Digital Contention: The Politics of Everyday Life in Tunisia

The book narrates the story of the co-evolution of technology and society in Tunisia, the birthplace of the Arab uprisings. It explores the emergence of a digital culture of contention that helped networked publics negotiate their lived reality, reconfigure power relations, and ultimately redefine the locus of politics. It broadens the focus from narrow debates about the role that social media played in the Arab uprisings toward a fresh understanding of how changes in media affect the state-society relationship over time. Based on extensive fieldwork, in-depth interviews with Internet activists, and immersive analyses of online communication, this book draws our attention away from the tools of political communication and refocuses it on the politics of communication.

New Project: Roshan Initiative in Persian Digital Humanities

The Roshan Institute for Persian Studies at the University of Maryland, College Park has embarked on an ambitious Persian digital humanities initiative, called the Roshan Initiative in Persian Digital Humanities at the University of Maryland (PersDig@UMD). The initiative is a collaborative effort involving the Maryland Institute for Technology in the Humanities (MITH), UMD’s library services, and Maryland Language Science Center (MLSC). They currently are developing six projects: DocuNow Persian Archive, Persian Digital Manuscript Archive, Persian E-Book Database, Roshan Institute Open-Access E-Books, the Persian Digital Library, and the Lalehzar Street Digital Archive.

New Book: Media, Diaspora and Conflict: Nationalism and Identity Amongst Turkish and Kurdish Migrants in Europe

The book offers an analysis of how Turkish and Kurdish migrants in Europe react to the myriad mediated narratives. A vital element is how media outlets report and represent the ethno-national conflict between the Turkish state and the Kurdish PKK. Janroj Yilmaz Keles here offers an examination of how Turkish and Kurdish migrants in Europe react to the myriad narratives that arise. Taking as his starting point an analysis of the nature of nationalisms in the modern age, Keles shows how language is often a central element in the struggle for hegemony within a state. The media has become a site for the clash of representations in both Turkish and Kurdish languages, especially for those based in the diaspora in Europe.

New Book: Preaching Islamic Revival: Amr Khaled, Mass Media and Social Change in Egypt

The book examines the differences between Amr Khaled's pre-revolutionary and post-revolutionary messages and looking in-depth at how deals with the concepts of Islam and modernity. By examining issues such as Amr Khaled s use of mass media, his views on gender role and the nature of political and religious rule, the author offers a book which will appeal to those interested in the changes that Egypt has experienced over the last century.
page 3 of 53529 items