Anonymous, 11 Dec 2018
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New Book: Surviving Images: Cinema, War, and Cultural Memory in the Middle East

The book explores the prominent role of cinema in the development of cultural memory around war and conflict in colonial and postcolonial contexts. It does so through a study of three historical eras: the colonial period, the national-independence struggle, and the postcolonial. Beginning with a study of British colonial cinema on the Sudan, then exploring anti-colonial cinema in Algeria, Egypt and Tunisia, followed by case studies of films emerging from postcolonial contexts in Palestine, Iran, Lebanon, and Israel, this work aims to fill a gap in the critical literature on both Middle Eastern cinemas, and to contribute more broadly to scholarship on social trauma and cultural memory in colonial and postcolonial contexts.

New Book: Visual Occupations: Violence and Visibility in a Conflict Zone

The book shows how the Israeli Occupation of Palestine is driven by the unequal access to visual rights, or the right to control what can be seen, how, and from which position. Israel maintains this unequal balance by erasing the history and denying the existence of Palestinians, and by carefully concealing its own militarization. Israeli surveillance of Palestinians, combined with the militarized gaze of Israeli soldiers at places like roadside checkpoints, also serve as tools of dominance. Hochberg analyzes various works by Palestinian and Israeli artists, among them Elia Suleiman, Rula Halawani, Sharif Waked, Ari Folman, and Larry Abramson, whose films, art, and photography challenge the inequity of visual rights by altering, queering, and manipulating dominant modes of representing the conflict.

Winners of The BOBs/Deutsche Welle Blog Awards 2015

Deutsche Welle, Germany’s international broadcaster, announced the winners of its annual The BOBs/Deutsche Welle Blog Awards. Its Freedom of Speech Award went to Saudi blogger Raif Badawi. There were also three Jury Awards categories (Social Change, Privacy & Security, and Arts & Media) and 14 language-specific People Choice awards.

Book: Radicalization in Western Europe: Integration, Public Discourse and Loss of Identity among Muslim Communities

Employing a theoretical framework based on the concept of identity loss, this book seeks to understand why increased integration has stimulated greater radicalization among the Muslim populations in Western Europe. Through extensive field research in four European countries – the UK, the Netherlands, Germany and France – the authors investigate three key questions: 1) Why are 2nd and 3rd generations of Muslims in Europe more radical than their parents?; 2) Why does Europe experience more "home-grown terrorism" today than thirty or forty years ago?; 3) Why do some European countries feature more radical Muslim communities than others?

Book: Medina in Birmingham, Najaf in Brent: Inside British Islam

This book is a definitive guide to the ideological differences, organisational structures and international links of the main Islamic groups active in Britain today. The vast majority of Britain’s 1600 mosques are linked to wider sectarian networks: the Deobandi and Tablighi Jamaat movements with their origins in colonial India; the Salafi groups inspired by an austere form of Islam widely practiced in Saudi Arabia; the Islamist movements with links to religious political parties in the Middle East and South Asia; the Sufi movements that tend to emphasise spirituality rather than religious and political militancy; and the diverse Shi’ite sects which range from the orthodox disciples of Grand Ayatollah Sistani in Iraq to the Ismaili followers of the pragmatic and modernising Aga Khan.

New Book: ‘We Love Death As You Love Life’: Britain's Suburban Terrorists

This book offers an insight into the motivations behind Mohammed Siddique Khan and his group, as well as the hundreds of young British Muslims who have been drawn by jihadist ideas to fight on battlefields at home and abroad. From the arrival of immigrant communities to the UK and the establishment of diasporas with strong ethnic connections to the Middle East and South Asia, to the arrival of jihadist warriors fresh from the anti-Soviet war in Afghanistan, Pantucci looks at the history that came before Mohammed Siddique Khan and places his action within its larger context.

Report: Jihad Trending: A Comprehensive Analysis of Online Extremism and How to Counter It

Quilliam Foundation released its new report titled "Jihad Trending: A Comprehensive Analysis of Online Extremism and How to Counter It" written by Ghaffar Hussain and Erin Marie Saltman. The research conducted for this report focuses on Islamist extremist groups operating in the UK and France, mapping their use of the Internet and what they hope to achieve through heir online activities.

Book: Terrorist Transgressions: Gender and the Visual Culture of the Terrorist

This book explores how the terrorist is represented and the processes through which they have subsumed so many popular cultural myths. It discusses how a terrorist's capacity for destruction can be linked to their appropriation or rejection of gender stereotypes and includes essays on masculinities in post-conflict Northern Ireland, gendered insurgency, the colonial state of exception, Oedipal rivalries, the German Red Army Faction, masculinity in Fox television saga 24 and Anders Behring Breivik's sartorial code. In addition to essays that debate the broad imagery that surrounds terrorism's visual cultures it includes pages by artists who question the role of censorship and the physiognomy of evil.

New Issue of the Journal of Media and Religion

Journal of Media and Religion released its new issue (Vol. 14, Issue 1, 2015). The issue looks at the media's role in silencing religious dialogue among U.S. Muslims, and other topics.

New Issue of the Online – Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet

The Institute for Religious Studies at the University of Heidelberg released a new issue of its Online – Heidelberg Journal of Religions on the Internet (Vol 7, 2015) titled Religion in Digital Games Reloaded edited by Simone Heidbrink, Tobias Knoll and Jan Wysocki.
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